White Fire at Wolf Ridge

What do you get when you mix:
Hopkins Field Biology Class + the beautiful northwoods + O2?

 Charlie McAllister

Charlie McAllister

 

 

I am the dark but glistening water
I am the hard and ancient rock beneath you
I am the trees and bushes that rustle in the wind

 

 

 

Jesper Hoffman

Jesper Hoffman

14JH5

Jesper Hoffman

I am the distance with so many wonders
I am the clouds that cover the sun.
I am the flowers that are bright among the rest.
I am the stumps that you pass with no looks.

 

Hannah Arms Regenold

Hannah Arms Regenold

 

 

I am me, admiring all these things,
Not behind a TV, or a screen,
but within my own eyes

Feeling it in my soul
As all this beauty, adventure, and harmony

Stands so tall and powerful among me.
Bryn Pursey

 

 

 

 

Mary O'Neil

Mary O’Neil

 

Teach Me

Teach me to grow and strengthen everyday
Like your wooded open arms
Teach me to nurture and enjoy
Teach me

 

 

 

vachone Hall

Vachone Hall

 

Teach me to breathe, absorb smells of fresh pine and wet new soil.
Teach me to be a family, living together in harmony
Teach me mother nature how to be.

 

 

 

 

Sundew Jennifer Patten

Sundew
Jennifer Patten

 

Teach me to blossom and bloom
Teach me your songs of thunder and wind
Teach me how to be a light as you carry the sun on your shoulders
Teach me calm and serenity
Teach me mother nature how to be
Meg Jenny

 

 

 

 

Quinn Gjernes

Quinn Gjernes

Teach Me
Lyrics by Meg Jenny
Arrangement and Music by Edward Jones
Vocals: Edward Jones and Larry Wade

Listen:

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Evan Garner

Evan Garner

 

A soft summer wind blows
The trees rustle to say hello
The leaves dance wildly
Clinging to the branches
A leaf or two falls off into the breeze
And scrapes the ground softly with ease.
Lucy Smith

 

 

Liam Doyle

Liam Doyle

I am the rocks we sit upon
I am the cliff that hangs over the lake
I am the darkness that covers the beauty
I am the man who watches the trees.
George Dunkelberger

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Charlie McAllister

I am the mist hanging in the midsummer’s air `
I am the breeze refreshing, yet cold and stinging
I am the shifting boulders who stand infallible and unequaled
I am the dove bringing good omens to the earth.
Alex Patridge

Savannah Graham

Savannah Graham

 

I am the wind on the great lake
I am the rocks jagged and sharp
I am the bees, birds and trees
I am the trees swaying like a mystical hare.
I am Wolf Ridge and Wolf Ridge is me.
Sam Driver

 

 

 

 

Evan Erickson

Evan Erickson

 

Stones are rocks and bountiful
They can be mountains or pebbles
Red, white, blue, green or brown
Rocks await to be found.
Some are bland, some are speckled, some are striped
Some so dark, they fade into the night.
Lucy Smith

 

                                              Photo Gallery

Vachone Hall

Vachone Hall

Vachone Hall

Vachone Hall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Barnier

Steven Barnier

Mary O'Neil

Mary O’Neil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vachone Hall

Vachone Hall

Mary O'Neil

Mary O’Neil

Jesper Hoffman

Jesper Hoffman

 

Jesper Hoffman

Jesper Hoffman

Hannah Arms Regenold

Hannah Arms Regenold

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jennifer Patten

Jennifer Patten

 

Gabriella Rice

Gabriella Rice

 

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Charlie McAllister

Liam Doyle

Liam Doyle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alli Petersen

Alli Petersen

 

Scott Stillman

Scott Stillman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allie Petersen

Alli Petersen

 

Vachone Hall

Vachone Hall

Posted in Connecting to Nature, Nature Poetry, Photography/Art | 3 Comments

Call for Stories and Photos

Have you had an interaction or connection with a living thing that touched you? Don’t be shy! All stories will be celebrated.

Send me your stories and a photo. Try to limit your story to 2 paragraphs. If you don’t have a photo send your story and I’ll add one of my photos. If you want some help writing your story, I’ll work with you.  Send your material to:
larrywade16@gmail.com

Your story will be posted at this website on August 1st . The last day to send a story will be July 28th.

Below is an example sent in by Dewey Hassig.

                                                    Where Smart Birds Nest

cardinal nest on the underside of a canoe seat.

cardinal nest on the underside of a canoe seat.

I won’t be canoeing this spring. My canoe is upside down on a rack on the back of my garage, and a Cardinal has made it’s nest on the seat. At least that Cardinal has a dry spot to nest.” (Editor Note. Dewey sent this to me in May and I saw him a month later and he said that the Cardinal abandoned the nest with one egg in it and re-nested on the opposite seat).

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Flooded Banks

Fourteen teenagers face the wilds of the swollen Minnesota River and try to be true to their art and creativity.

Flooded Bike Path Fort Snelling (Eduardo Tomas Nieves)

Flooded Bike Path Fort Snelling (Eduardo Tomas Nieves)

 

I am drowning.

Road to Fort Snelling State Park (Carmen Erickson)

Road to Fort Snelling State Park (Carmen Erickson)

I slowly sink deeper into a dark abyss.

This weight getting heavier

Dragging me

Deeper and deeper into the depths.

The light shrinking;

Surroundings less identifiable.

I’m lost in my thoughts, scared. Alone.

I reach my hand up

Bluet Damselfly (Eduardo Tomas Nieves)

Bluet Damselfly
(Eduardo Tomas Nieves)

Hoping

That someone will reach down and save me.

I’m still reaching.

I’m still hoping

I’m still drowning.

Carmen Erickson

 

 

AJ Vue

AJ Vue

Nature.

I see mosquitoes.

I touch my swollen mosquito bites.

I hear the buzzing of mosquitoes in my ear.

I feel angry.

Nature.

 

Damn these mosquitoes.

Going outside is alright.

Ha Ha, that’s funny.

Lee Cygan

Mosquitoes

Burn it with fire,    Drown it with water,    Blast it with wind,   Crush it with stone.

Foul creatures  Born from evil,   Blessed with poison,    Death to it all    Mosquitoes 

Plague that must fall.                           - AJ Vue

Box Elder Bugs on Box Elder leaves

Box Elder Bugs on Box Elder leaves (Guadalupe Lizeth Lima Soto)

Never expect something

Six Spotted Tiger Beetle (Guadalupe Lizeth Lima Soto)

Six Spotted Tiger Beetle
(Guadalupe Lizeth Lima Soto)

 As beautiful as nature

To stay the same.

Usually there are

Remarkable differences in

Every inch of space you observe.

- Carmen Erickson

 

 

P1100862

Fox Snake

Guadalupe came running down the stairs, her eyes wide with excitement. “ I saw the snake.” I told her there must have been a reason she was the only one to see it. As we walked back, she told me she was an Aztec dancer. From the Aztec calendar, one of her birth symbols is the snake. Because of her connection with snakes, Guadalupe can feel the vibrations of things and people around her.

Larry Wade

 

deer carcass (Guadalupe Lizeth Lima Soto)

deer carcass
(Guadalupe Lizeth Lima Soto)

Where does Beauty hide?
In the green roots of
yarrow leaves, dug in
the wounds of history’s wars
Within the king’s mushrooms
his cap showered with pride
in the audience of his subjects.
And in the corpse of a
deer long lost cousin,
Whose remains will sunk
back to life’s beginnings.

Red ants cling to bark in the swollen river. (Eduardo Tomas Nieves)

Red ants cling to bark in the swollen river.
(Eduardo Tomas Nieves)

Where does Beauty hide?
On the murky river of
no return, flowing and flowing
on an endless journey.
In Noah’s bark, the boat
of life that civilization clings
onto as it sways in the water

Where does Beauty hide?
In the lenses of Eyes
In the imagination of the Mind
In all living things.

- Xe Chang

 

Corrina Guerrero

Corrina Guerrero

 

 

 

Wind is blowing, clouds are bursting,

Water is dancing,

Waves are falling, Earth is screaming,

Flowers are singing,

Land is hiding,

Storms are coming.

- AJ Vue

 

 

 

 

 

Eduardo Tomas Nieves

Eduardo Tomas Nieves

Welcome to the city of long nights.

Vibrant yellow escorts

At a whistle’s beck and call.

Steamy kisses against bruised ankles.

Bright lights,

A bumblebee’s sting

In your greedy little irises,

Greasy fingers

And

Clouded thoughts

P1100868

Bluff Graffitti

 Foreign languages

Invade comfort zones.

GET OUT

Of my comfort zone,

Please.

- Roma Murphy

 

 

 

Last night I heard you sing to me.

Ashley Brewer

Paper collage inspired by poem
(Ashley Brewer)

Whispers echo through the roots of
the deep soil,

Making its way through the skimpy
branches of an aged tree.

I heard it jump through a vast

Body of cool blue water. The

Sweetness of your voice swarmed

Into my young ears,

Trickling into my deep core.

Last night I heard you sing.

- Ashley Brewer

 

Cottonwood reflection in the swollen waters

Cottonwood reflection in the swollen waters

We have been learning about Lakota culture, and it has inspired me to learn more about my culture and incorporate it into my art work. - Gabrielle Jackson

 

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Guadalupe Lizeth Lima Soto

 

 

 

I near the edge of the wild
Unwanted, but crucial
Seen, yet invisible,
Loving, but feared
And know that I can change this.

-Sam Porter

 

 

Gallery

Hackberry Emperor (Guadalupe Lizeth Lima Soto)

Hackberry Emperor
(Guadalupe Lizeth Lima Soto)

 

Sam Porter

Sam Porter

 

Harvestman eating a fly (Eduardo Tomas Nieves)

Harvestman eating a fly
(Eduardo Tomas Nieves)

 

Hackberry Emperor on Wambdi Wapaha's hat (Guadalupe Lizeth Lima Soto)

Hackberry Emperor on Wambdi Wapaha’s hat
(Guadalupe Lizeth Lima Soto)

 

Eduardo at Work

Eduardo looking for his next image.

Guadalupe catching a special moment in time.

Guadalupe catching a special moment in time.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Connecting to Nature, Nature Poetry, Photography/Art | 6 Comments

Lake Minnetonka’s Gift: Minnehaha Creek

“In the heart of Minnetonka you can find solitude and a connection between earth and sky, if you seek it”.

 

Photos and text by Dale Antonson

Minnehaha headwaters canoe launch at Gray's Bay Dam.

Minnehaha headwaters canoe launch at Gray’s Bay Dam.

If you live in Minnetonka and have yet to experience the serenity of paddling along the first few miles of Minnehaha Creek, I would like to share with you a little about this treasure that flows right through the heart of our community.

Minnehaha Creek begins at the Gray’s Bay Dam on the east side of Lake Minnetonka.  Here it begins its south-eastward journey 22 miles to the Mississippi River.   The first 2.5 miles of the creek, from the headwaters to the canoe landing at the historic Burwell House, offer the floating visitor opportunities to observe nature from the quiet waters that flow through mostly undeveloped wetlands and forested landscapes.

The Gray's Bay dam with an eagle searching for food in a dead elm tree.

The Gray’s Bay dam with an eagle searching for food from the branch of a dead elm tree.

Visiting is best between spring and summer, from the time the winter ice starts to melt in April to the warmer month of June. During this time,water’s flow is faster and the aquatic weeds won’t be an issue (later in the summer, paddling is impeded by both). A couple of hours are all that’s needed to escape into this serenity.  I encourage you to take your time and paddle at a leisurely pace.  As the Chinese philosopher and poet Lao Tzu wrote many years ago, “Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished.”

Looking east and downstream from the headwaters.

Looking east and downstream from the headwaters.

Parking at the Gray’s Bay Dam is really limited so it’s a good idea to arrange for someone who can drop you off with your canoe or kayak and pick you up later at your final destination. A good map of the creek is available here:   Minnehaha Creek Canoe map.pdf.  If you plan on continuing beyond the canoe landing at the Burwell House, where the creek becomes faster and difficult to navigate for the novice, it will be important to be aware of the current flow rate of the water through the Gray’s Bay Dam during your visit.  Water flow rates higher than 150 cubic feet per second are considered dangerous and the rapids should be avoided.  The current flow rate of the creek can be found at: Gray’s Bay Dam Flow Rate

leopardFrog

A leopard frog hoping to escape notice.

If you don’t have access to a canoe, The City of Minnetonka provides a canoe rental and shuttle service on weekends during May and June for 2 to 3-hour-long trips from the headwaters to the canoe landing at Hopkins Crossroads.  You can access information on this service at:  Minnetonka’s Canoe Minnehaha Creek. Participants register in advance and will meet the shuttle van at a reserved time at the ice arena behind Minnetonka City Hall at the ice arena.  From there, a van will drop participants off at the headwaters with any necessary gear and pick them up later at the designated location for return to their vehicles.

Yellow Water Iris

Yellow water iris in full bloom, concealing a muskrat lodge (Late May).

 

6

A beautiful egret plays “hide-and-go-seek” with those who paddle quietly and respect others’ privacy.

 

5

A sweeping bend in the creek, with the wide open sky and cattails, quickly gives way to the unexpected landing at Jidana Park.

 

7

The Jidana Park canoe landing is the first of many along the creek. This gem of Oak Savanna offers a delightful park to explore and have a picnic.

In the heart of Minnetonka you can find solitude and a connection between earth and sky, if you seek to find it.

In the heart of Minnetonka you can find solitude and a connection between earth and sky, if you seek to find it.

 

Bridge near the Ice area

Around a couple more bends you come upon this pedestrian bridge. It’s in close proximity to another canoe landing located on the north side of the Minnetonka City Hall acreage.

10

A Great Blue Heron stands quietly, hoping to avoid notice.

 

Can you see the wildlife community here?  A mud turtle, snapping turtle, egret and Canada goose delighting in the day.

Can you see the wildlife community here?
A mud turtle, snapping turtle, egret and Canada goose delighting in the day.

 Our author/photographer, along with his dog called “Jessie Joy the Happiness Consultant,” are doing something they love that connects them with nature.

The author/photographer, along with his dog called “Jessie Joy the Happiness Consultant,” are doing something they love that connects them with nature.

Relax, slow down, float away and discover something new this spring at the headwaters of Minnehaha Creek. Many hidden treasures await you there.

If you’d like to see more of Dale Antonson’s nature photographs, you’re invited to his exhibit of nature scenes at the Off the Wall gallery at the Hopkins Center For The Arts, from May 13 through June 9, 2014. The show is titled This Garden We Live In.

(All photographs were taken by a Casio EX-Z90)

Reader, Dewey Hassig shared the following comment:
“I won’t be canoeing this spring. My canoe is upside down on a rack on the back of my garage, and a Cardinal has made it’s nest on the seat. At least that Cardinal has a dry spot to nest.”

Posted in Connecting to Nature, Nature Notes | 3 Comments

Signs of Spring 2014

January 15
On a below zero morning I heard my first sign of spring. Who was calling in the cold?

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cardinal and  “fee bee” call  of the chickadee

January 17
I was skiing and heard the drumming of a downy woodpecker in the distance.

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March 7th
I saw these tracks going right by my front door. A raccoon had left its den and was searching for a mate.
Raccoon1

March 11
First chipmunk scurrying around. My dog was very excited.

Chipmunk

Chipmunk

March 19th
I saw and heard three flocks of geese fly overhead and I could feel the winter chill loosening its grip.

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March 23rd
The sweet song of bluebird was a welcome sound.

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BlueBird

 

The cooing of a mourning dove (March 23rd)

MourningDove3

 

Vultures circling on their northerly migration (March 23).

A soaring turkey vulture (photo by Mike Farrell)

(photo by Mike Farrell)

(March 23rd).  first killdeer

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Killdeer
Pussy willow flowers are starting to open (March 23rd).
PussyWillow

March 24th – Vole tunnels in the grass as the snow recedes.
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March 26th
A great blue heron flew overhead.

Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron

When I heard the first robin singing from the trees, it put a smile on my face (March 26th).

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First female robins return on April 17th.

Male robin

 

Male redwing blackbirds returned and were singing from the cattails (March 26th).

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RedWing1

April 4th
It was a short maple syrupping season, only a few days.

A box elder tree being tapped for sap.

A box elder tree being tapped for sap.

April 5
I saw my first wood ducks checking out the pond near my house.

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MFWoodDuckWade

April 7th  first 60° day
Mourning cloak butterfly. One of the few butterflies that over- winter.

Mourning cloak

Mourning cloak

April 12th

The chorus frogs started singing two days ago. If you listen to the recording, you will hear the chorus frogs and the “clucking” of the wood frog.

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A calling wood frog with inflated abdominal sacs.

A calling wood frog with inflated abdominal sacs.

 

April 13 – First Wild Leek – A blessing to see something green emerging from the earth.

1WildLeek

April 20th Flicker Calling

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Common Flicker  photo by Linnea Palmquist

Common Flicker
photo by Linnea Palmquist

April 21st

First hepatica blooming
hepatica1

May 1st First painted turtle

Painted turtle sunning itself.

Painted turtle sunning itself.

May 5th American toads start singing

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Toads1

 

 

Posted in Nature Notes, Uncategorized | 5 Comments

Global Warming? – Not After This Winter!

We can not predict climate change (global warming)  by studying local weather patterns.

Thanks to  Dr. Lee Frelich, Director of the U. Minnesota Center for Forest Ecology for contributing the graphics and making editing suggestions.

Are you thinking what I am thinking? There is no global warming in Minnesota. After 50 days of sub-zero weather this winter, who wouldn’t be thinking this?

SubZeronTracker

In the graph below, the light blue area (labeled “Trough”) shows the Arctic cold temperatures that much of the Eastern United states experienced this winter (2013 and 2014), while the West had above average temperatures (labeled “Ridge”) and parts of California experienced record warm temperatures.

WinterTrough

The reddish areas in the graphic below shows where temperatures were warmer than average in January, 2014. While purple shows locations where temperatures were colder than average. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to notice that there is a lot more red (warmer temps) than there is purple (colder temps) on the graphic below. In fact, world-wide, it was the 4th warmest January in 134 years of record. On January 6, 2014 the high temperature in the Twin Cities was -12° F. On Jan 27th the high temperature was -6°F in the Twin Cities while the high in Nome, Alaska climbed to 51° F. We can not predict climate change (Global Warming)  by studying local weather patterns. Climate change is a global phenomena and we need to look at the temperatures of the Earth as a whole.
WorldTempJan2014The graphic below shows temperature change over a 10,000 year period. For the last  5000 years the temperatures on the earth has been getting cooler. But roughly 50 years ago the temperatures began to spike (red line). The graph uses the term temperature anomaly which is the difference between the long term average temperature and the temperature of a given year. So if the temperature was colder than the long-term average, the trend line is below the zero point on the left axis, and if the warmer than the long-term average, the trend line is above the zero.

TempChange10,000years_edited-1Does anyone remember March 2012? The entire month was warm and the earliest 80°F temperature ever recorded was on March 17th. Was this a sign of global warming (trick question)? Answer: you can not predict global climate change based upon local weather.
In March of 2012, the jet stream was positioned so that there was record heat East of the Rockies and cold to the west of the Rockies (graphic on the right).

  Magnolia's blooming in March, St. Paul, MN, 2012.

Magnolia’s blooming in March, St. Paul, MN, 2012.
Photo by Jenna Williams

Screen Shot 2014-03-22 at 3.40.08 PM

Graphic by Dr. Frelich, U. MN

 

 

If nothing changes and global warming continues unabated, Dr. Frelich predicts that Minnesota’s summer climate will be more like Kansas and Nebraska by the end of the century. As a result, there could be a 300 mile northward range shifts of habitat (graphic below).

Screen Shot 2014-03-22 at 3.51.10 PM

Graphic by Dr. Frelich, U. Minnesota

 

If global warming goes unchecked, there will be winners and losers. Tree species in the Boreal community will disappear and moose and lynx will no longer be found in Minnesota.

Jack Pine Community

The boreal community will no longer exist.
Graphic by Dr. Frelich, U. Minnesota

New species of trees will take the boreal community’s place. There will be more deer, wolves, and bobcats.
Screen Shot 2014-03-22 at 4.17.43 PM

  This is not the kind of legacy that we want to leave our children and grandchildren. There is a lot that we can all do individually. If you are compelled to make a change in your life style and want to be part of the solution, go to the following links:

10 personal solutions to global warming:
http://www.ucsusa.org/global_warming/what_you_can_do/#Take_Personal_Action

10 solutions to climate change:
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/10-solutions-for-climate-change/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Seasons, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Finding Magic in Evergreen Park

Evergreen Park is a small 20 acre park in my town. It is not a destination that most people would be hungry to visit. Last week-end (March 22-23, 2014), I was able to walk in places I had never been because the snow was so compacted (All winter long, if I took one step off the trail, I’d be up to knees in snow).  It was a very freeing experience and I found a deep wildness off the trail that had a sense of magic.

Can you find the little critters in this ice that had melted and refroze.

Can you find the little critters in this ice that had melted and refroze?

 

redOakleaf

A red oak leaf frozen in time

Frozen Mouse Hole

Frozen Mouse Hole

A thawed and refrozen puddle.

A thawed and refrozen puddle.

Creatures moving through the fresh dusting of snow. Who are they?

a.

a.

b.

b.

 

 

c.

c.

 

 

a.squirrel  b. weasel  c. raccoon

The blessing of the morning sun

The blessing of the morning sun

The Twin Oaks on Skunk Hill photo Dale Antonsen

The Twin Oaks on Skunk Hill
photo Dale Antonsen

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Who are These People?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe issue here is not just about dog poop. It is more about caring for our wild spaces. When we are out for a walk, are we conscience of the land and the parks we value so much?

 Dog People love our dogs and some of us enjoy the freedom of walking our dogs on frozen lakes and creeks near our homes. “Who are these people?” That was the question I was asking last Saturday, when I picked up 30 pounds of dog poop on a stretch of frozen of creek. On Sunday, I picked up another 40 pounds in the park near my house. Also, I have talked to others who have told me that Lake Minnetonka is littered with poop piles. I wonder if those dog owners treat the land around their own homes in a similar manner. What seems to be missing in my suburban neighborhood is a land-ethic: having the same care and attention for our parks and wild spaces that we have for our homes.

Why be concerned about dog poop?

  • 1. Fecal coliform bacteria are common to the intestinal tracts of humans and animals.  These bacteria can enter water bodies from human and animal waste and may cause illness and disease if they do.
  • One gram of dog waste (the weight of a business card) contains 23 million fecal coliform bacteria (van der Wel, 1995), almost twice as much as human waste.  Keep in mind that the average dog excretes 0.75 pounds of waste per day (340 grams).  That equates to 7.82 billion fecal coliform bacteria per day! (For more information go to: www.clearchoicescleanwater.org)
  • Seeing dog poop along the trail is disrespectful to other users of the space.

The issue here is not just about dog poop. It is more about caring for our wild spaces. When we are out for a walk, are we conscience of the land and the parks we value so much? I think most Minnesotans are respectful of the land and don’t want to see it degraded. But the “straight poop” is: I had four bags filled with a total of 70 pounds of poop and we should not be treating the land with such disrespect.

Contributor Grace Sheely added the following valuable comments and ideas:
“I got 100 over pounds up in 3 hours at Purgatory Park…I felt that it was all headed for the creek last week.  I jotted down the responses of people watching me.  One indignant older man remarked that at least someone was picking up poop.  2 women happily helped carry my heavy collection bundles that littered the path to the trash.  One family with kids said that they would help if I left a bucket and a shovel/trowel.  I have been hand picking using plastic gloves when it is warmer and mushy.

I have tried to emphasize the creek protection to those that listen.  Most people seem to believe that the poop will degrade as fertilizer in the woods and that there is no need to pick it up.  The frozen ground and snow suggests otherwise to me but the education component is missing.

As you are aware, the negative message of “not doing your share of the clean up” is not going to do any good.  We cannot shame or blame others into submission.

Ideas to  create a new mindset
Poop as an Easter egg hunt?  My water group last night felt the best solution was to make it a competition with a scale and a photo/email posting site.  Prizes from the community for most poop by a person or group.  Or else plan a group event for set day and time.  Seeing all the poop is believing.  The quantity is amazing as you also noticed.  I can pick-up poop at rate of 30 lbs/ hour.  Two hours and my arms and back are sore (good workout).”

Posted in Connecting to Nature | 6 Comments

Español en Naturaleza

Como está su español naturaleza? Cuántos palabras español sabe de seres viventes en la naturaleza? Despuis, compa su repuestas con la clave a de abajo de la página. How is your “nature spanish”? How many Spanish words you know of living beings in nature? Then check your answers with the key at the bottom of the posting.

photos by Old Naturalist – unless noted
forest

1. forest

Oak Tree

2. Oak tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. _____________________________                 2. _______________________

acorn

3. acorn

Sugar Maple

4. Sugar Maple

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3._____________________                                          4. ______________________

Red Squirrel (Paul Gagner)

5. Red Squirrel (Paul Gagner)

Deer  (Paul Gagner)

6. Deer (Paul Gagner)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. _________________________                       6. _________________________

Red fox

7. Red fox

Rabbit

8. Rabbit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. _________________________                             8. __________________

raccoon www.nhptv.org/natureworks

9. raccoon
www.nhptv.org/natureworks

Beaver

10. Beaver

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. __________________________                           10. ____________________

 Duck

11. Wood Duck (Paul Gagner)

 Woodpecker

12. Woodpecker (Paul Gagner)

 

 

 

 

 

 

11. _______________________                     12. __________________________

Great Blue Heron (Paul Gagner)

13. Great Blue Heron
(Paul Gagner)

Owl

14. Owl (Paul Gagner)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13. _____________________________          14. ________________________

Grasshopper

15. Grasshopper

Spider

16. Spider

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15. _________________                                                    16. ____________________

 

18. Butterfly

17. butterfly

Migrating monarchs resting in the morning light

18. monarch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17. ________________________                18. __________________________

 

Honey bee

19. Honey bee

Dragonfly

20. Dragonfly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19. _________________                                 20. _________________________

 

21. turtle

21. turtle

 frog

22. frog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21. _____________________              22. ____________________________

 

Hummingbird

24. Hummingbird

Mink

23. Mink

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23. ___________________                        24. ___________________________

 

 

Key

1. bosque   2. árbol de roble   3. bellota     4. arce dulce    5. ardilla rojo      6. venado             7. zorro rojo 8. conejo   9. mapache  10. castor  11. pato madero   12. carpintero                  13. gran garza azul  14. lechuza/buho 15. saltamonte  16. araña 17. mariposa                          18. monarca   19. abeja de la miel  20. libélula   21. tortuga  22. rana                                         23. visón     24. colibrí

 

 

Posted in Connecting to Nature | 1 Comment

Staying One Step Ahead of the Winter Blues

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHave you been letting a negative attitude dominate your emotions this winter? It is easy to understand how that could happen with the sub-zero temperatures we have been experiencing; the lack of sunlight; the daily news; the destruction of our environment; etc.

 

Have I got an antidote for you!

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  • Bundle up (I have 3 layers on most of my body and a full head scarf) !
  •  Go to your nearest wild area/park at least once a day.
  • Power walking is okay because it keeps you warm. But “intentional nature hikes” can be more satisfying because you become connected to nature. You are able to feel more alive, and for a time step out of those things that were dragging you down.

What is an intentional nature hike?

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  • The first 10 minutes,  walk normally, let your body adjust to the temperature and
    to the place where you are walking.
  • The remainder of the time, focus your thoughts are focused on the present.
  • If you realize you are thinking about other things, stop walking for 10 seconds and re-focus.
  • Let nature show its hidden beauty – look for patterns, shadows, and animal tracks in the snow.

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  • A variation on this activity is to find new things that you’ve never seen. This morning I saw 7 new things (I wonder if they were really “new” or if my memory is really poor). Regardless, this type of activity will keep you focused and fresh.
  • Listening is another form of connecting to nature. Listening to the sounds of the morning birds: the spring call of a cardinal or the “fee-bee” call of a chickadee. Also listening when there is no sound at all.  Listening to the earth: an old oak; a glacial moraine; a grove of birch. You may not hear anything, but feel it on an energetic level.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAJed Krauss explains “listening to silence” in this way:  “I feel the silence of nature more like a touch (like when a sound wave vibrates through my body). There are other times when I’m just too addicted to my own thoughts to listen. For me, listening to the silence is the most rewarding type of meditation. More than just quieting my mind, this is opening my self up to be touched by Creation, in whatever way it chooses.”

 

On your intentional nature hike, you may see or hear special things. Try to identify the following sights and sounds. Then check the key at the end of the post.
Sounds:

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1.

2.

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3.

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4.

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4a.

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5.

 

Raccoon1

6.

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8.

 

 

 

 

 

 

rabbit

7.

 

 

 

 

 

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9.

 

 

 

10.

10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11.

11.

 

SunDog

12.

 

key: 1. Squirrel refrigerator 2. spring call of a nuthatch 3. spring call of chickadee
4. spring call of a cardinal 4a. Rustling of red oak leaves in the wind 5. squirrel tracks 6. raccoon tracks 7. rabbit tracks
8. mice tracks 9. deer tracks 10. fox tracks 11. Owl wing prints in the snow  12. Sun dog
Posted in Connecting to Nature, Nature Notes, Winter | 8 Comments