Moments with Nature

Paul Vitko is an artist, and has shared some of the work from his own back yard. If you would like to see more of Paul’s work go to: paulvitko.com.


The challenge is being present in the moment, seeing, translating, and using your heart to create.  Paul Vitko

Ambush bug
Paul Vitko

Creating photographic images can challenge one very deeply. Nature responds to an inner respect for life forms, finding working boundaries, and learning to be ‘non-threatening’. These are all aspects, besides a  camera, that require developing a second nature so you can be free and feeling in the moment.

Meadowhawk
Paul Vitko

Creating images with a camera is my passion. Traveling around the world  fueled my passion, but soon the photography journey would come closer to home, like right in my backyard. By realizing what an incredible world is in the immediate environment,  I learned to ‘see’ what I wasn’t noticing

Honey Bee
Paul Vitko

An early image of a bee and flower, was my entrance into starting to grow a wildflower garden for continuous opportunities to create images about bees, insects, and flowers. The first garden was very simple, scratched a patch of dirt, scattered seeds, and then in the summer, photographed whatever showed up.

A pollen-covered honey bee
Paul Vitko

I started using a film camera in my late teens; a degree in fine arts (painting & photography); and took many thousands of images. Now when I create images, it is with my experiences, innate feelings, & knowingness. All this is present when I enter a  “zone” where linear time no longer exists. In this space, I feel ‘one’ with the environment, like I am just another life form, being present in the moment. This is where my best work takes place.

Paul Vitko

Hummingbirds bring me great joy, just to be with those moments, sitting, watching and enjoying their movements. The additional enjoyment is creating images during those moments. Yellow jackets and hummingbirds get very competitive around the feeders, especially late summer and fall, very entertaining.

Paul Vitko

Paul Vitko

Just being present in life exposes one to moments not typically noticed, like an eagle landing in a tree in my backyard. About 4 years ago, around the winter solstice, while preparing dinner, this beautiful eagle with a dead squirrel in its talons, landed on a branch that was visible out my kitchen window. My camera was nearby, I went out back to photograph it,  but unfortunately while attempting to get closer, (broke the boundary issue), the distraction was too much and it flew away.

Bald Eagle
Paul Vitko

In my opinion, one can have the fanciest or the simplest equipment, but it gets down to the eye of the person behind the camera. As with most things, there is a timing involved. Will you be present to notice, compose and create the image? It is important, to know how to use your tools, so you can let go of figuring it out. The challenge is being present in the moment, seeing, translating, and using your heart to create.

Hummingbird Moth
Paul Vitko

 

I have never been stung or bit by an insect in all my years of photographing.

Hide and Seek with a Milkweed bug
Paul Vitko

Cicada Exoskeleton
Paul Vitko

Posted in Photography/Art | 1 Comment

Travels with the Earth Oracle

book-one-cover

I recently read an important new book on Earth Spirituality, called “Travels with the Earth Oracle”. This the story of a group of people who traveled to sacred areas around the world.The book is about engaging with the Earth in a spiritual way, through wisdom channeled from  locations around the world.  What I love about this book is that I could feel the struggle that these seekers had working to bring more planetary consciousness into their lives. If you would like to learn more about Travels with the Earth Oracle go to:

www.theearthoracle.com.

“As planetary beings your primary purpose above all others is to help

              sustain the Earth’s balance and fortify its ability to create life.”
The back cover reads: “Join us on our “Travels with the Earth Oracle” where you’ll be meeting spiritual teachers, ancient sages, warriors, planetary life forms and highly conscious beings who walked the planet long ago. Pack your boots, you’re going to be hiking a lot, climbing sacred mountains, sweating inside a great pyramid, meeting with a tribe of rain forest people, and stretching your consciousness in startling ways.

As one of the travelers said, “It is a lot cheaper and less stressful to read this book, rather than to have been a participant on one of those trips”.

fingles-cave

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Holiday Books for Nature Loving Kids

During the holidays, you can buy my books at a 50% discount off of the retail price. Each book is priced at $12 + $3 shipping = $15. I will sign all books. Books can be returned for 100% refund.

Nature Seeker Workbook

Wade Cover 020913_flt@300 copy 2Nature Seeker Workbook is the product of 20 years of work as a naturalist in Minnetonka/Hopkins. Over 600 books have been sold in three years. It is a unique personal field guide to the natural world in Central Minnesota.
Over 50 field-tested activities. Hundreds of detailed and original drawings.
Highlights natural history through all seasons
Entire units to forest and wetland ecology
Includes Nature songs, poetry, weaving and more
For students  2nd – 6th grade 157 pages  (2013)

 

 

OceanographyOceanography includes challenging activities on physical oceanography, biological oceanography, interviews with oceanographers and a teacher’s key. For students 4th-7th grade. Over 5000 copies of this book has been sold. This book is in its 6th revision (2015). 144 pgs. topics:
Plate Tectonics          Marine Communities
Geology of seafloor   Marine Plankton
Mapping the Seafloor   Marine Food Webs
Ocean currents               Food pyramids

To learn more about Oceanography and Getting to Know the Whales go to:  www.oldnaturalist.com/oceanographywhales/ or go to the pull down menu at this site and go to Publications. Click on Whales/oceanography.

GettingtoKnowWhalesThis book had to be written because of the author and illustrator’s passion for whales. Whale biologists have readily contributed data to make whales come to life for children. For students 4th-7th grade. Over 5000 copies of this book has been sold. This book is in its 5th revision (2015). 146 pages

 

Whale Biology Topics
Draw a whale         Prehistoric whales   Whale and dolphin key      Whale dissection
How Whales feed       Lunge-feeding flip book           How Whales Breathe
How long doe a Whale dive?       A Day with a Blue          Whales  How Fast is a Whale
Whale Migration              Year in the life of a Humpback Whale

How to purchase:
1. Send a check for $15.
2.  order by email:  larrywade16@gmail.com
3. call me to order:  (952) 288-5025
4. You can also pay by credit card through PayPal go to: /www.oldnaturalist.com/nature-seeker-workbook/  and scroll down  ( Nature Seeker only – $19.46 includes shipping)
5. All three books are on Amazon – $ 21.00 includes shipping
At Amazon, only purchase the following editions:
Whales in the Classroom, Oceanography 6th edition
Getting to Know the Whales, 5th Edition
Nature Seeker Workbook

Larry Wade
15524 Day Place
Minnetonka, MN 55345

Will ship within 24 hours. Send me your email address and I’ll get the tracking numbers to you. The last day for the sale is Dec. 22.

 

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Gatewood School Poetry Residency 2016

Many thanks to the Gatewood PTO, who funded the poetry residency for many years.

Maple Leaf Glasses

Maple Leaf Glasses


 

Tiger Fly
It’s a beautiful butterfly

Golden as the sun
Sometimes I wonder
How old it was
But now I’m sad
Because it is Dead
A beautiful butterfly
I once could’ve said
Sonia Lerner

 

 

Where Does Beauty Hide?
In the diversity of cultures
In the colors on our posters
In the foggy rain on our skylight

Where Does Beauty Hide?
In the sparks of inspiration
In the brightness of our teacher
On all the different flags

Where Does Beauty Hide?
In all the growing trust and respect
In all the knowledge in the books
On everything worked for
In all of Gatewood!!

Jeulien Long-Wynne

 

 

Sea Star

Sea Star

So small and fragile
This fish eats from the bottom
It pricks your finger
Paris Cruse

 

 

 

 

 

shark jaw

shark jaw

Ocean predator
Sitting with its mouth wide open
Swimming in heaven

Jude Lulu

 

 

 

vertebra

vertebra

 

 

The whale bone is hard
Humongous and very rough

Found by the seashore
Hans Greenwood

Cottonwood

Cottonwood

The tree is so big
The leaves dance down the tree to the ground.
The wind sings to the tree and me,
I feel like an ant being among the nine tree trunks.
The branches sway,
Waving “hi” to anyone who comes by.
The leaves,have many colors,
So unique.
Isabella Gomez

Ben and Bennett

(Note  the video only plays using Safari)

Bear

Bear skull

Harder than a rock
As smooth as a stone
I wonder if my head is gonna be as big as that bone
I feel like it got hit by a gnome
Sum up the poem
It’s harder than a stone

Bennett Frodermann and Ben Joppa

 

 

Where does beauty hide?
The colorful Artwork of the halls
The pictures of families
On the American flag
In the darkness of our classroom
The sounds of the 5th grade pod
Where does the beauty hide?
Inside our school
Dee Johnston

 

 

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Gatewood School

Where Does Beauty Hide?
In the clear skies above us
In the colorful posters on the walls
On all of the flags
Where Does Beauty Hide?
In the creativeness of our artwork
In the friendship of all of us
In the designs on the couches
In the colors on the walls
Where Does Beauty Hide?
Inside the school

Kaia Johnson

 

antlers

Deer Antlers

Furry but hard
Small but has big scratch marks
I wonder how it got scratch marks
I feel sad because the deer is gone
Without its antlers
The antlers are small
But  BIG in its own way

Isabella Gomez

 

 

student work at Gatewood School

student work at Gatewood School

Where does beauty hide
Inside the class
In the posters
Brightness of our teacher
In the sky light
In the darkness
In the friendship of all of us
The the walls in the hallways
On the flag
In the library
In the classroom.

Kevin Machoga

 

Where does beauty hide?art
In the helpings of our teachers
In the culture all around us,
In the peaceful blue sky,
In the talented work of art,
In the calmness of our library.
Inside our school

Sheily Leguizamo

 

Where does beauty hide?
In the brightness of our teacher
In the
life of the students
In the
colors of the flags
Where does beauty hide?
In the unique drawings on the walls
In the laughter of the students
In the smell of
lavender
Where does beauty hide?
In our school!
Arianna Bull

 

Where Does Beauty Hide?
Inside our classroom

In the Star Spangled Banner
In the Minnesota posters on the wall
Where does beauty hide?
In the brightness of our teacher

In all the country flags in the hall
In the artwork on the walls
Where does beauty hide?
In the Gatewood sign in front of the school

Inside of Gatewood Elementary.

Liam Raymond Urbanowicz

Where Does Beauty Hide?
In the greatness of our art.

In the sounds of learning classrooms.
On the colorful posters.
In the friendship of all of us.
Where Does Beauty Hide?
Inside the school

Layla Sremcevic

Where does Beauty hide.
In our class.
On the American flag.
In the colorful posters on the wall.
Where does Beauty hide?
In the brightness in our teacher.
In the friendship in all of us.
In the classroom’s learning.
In the library that keeps us reading.
Where does Beauty hide?
In the different culture´s flags.
In the office that has our awesome principal.
In the lunchroom that lets us eat.
In the clear skies that keeps me happy.
Where does Beauty hide?
IN OUR SCHOOL!

Jake Joseph Nordean

 

 

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Fish Whisperer

First snorkel
Perched on a rock in the rapids
A large muskie swam up and rested beside me
Ecstatic
wondered if I should be panicked.
Hoped that I was not wearing anything shiny
that looked tasty to a muskie.

Muskie

Muskie

Welcome to the underwater world.

This northern pike was blind on the right side. No wonder it was so friendly.

This northern pike was blind on the right side. No wonder it was so friendly.

Be open to the unknown. Beauty and the mystery awaits you.

Bowfin or dogfish, a bottom feeder. Primitive, creepy and beautiful.

Bowfin or dogfish, a bottom feeder. Primitive, creepy and beautiful.

Life abounds,  a spiritual connection with the water beings.

This painted turtle swam right up to me. I thought it was going to bite my nose.

This painted turtle swam right up to me. I thought it was going to bite my nose.

The lake water  is part of you now.
The water inside your body
may have once been part of the lake.


OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALight changes constantly
Depending upon the clouds and the wind.
It dances on the plants and the fish,
Creating a hypnotic connection.

Largemouth

Largemouth bass

Sometimes you see things that makes you thankful to be alive
And you stop breathing
Because you are afraid the experience might end.

Northern Pike

Northern Pike

My first large northern pike
Inching my way slowly towards it.
Hoping it would stay just one more second
Making promises that I could never keep.
Awed by its tremendous power and elegance.

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Water lilies
magical living beings
Connected to all the elements of life.
Their roots are in the earth
And live in both the water and air.
The sun is needed for photosynthesis.

Largemouth Bass

Largemouth Bass

This bass sashayed past me and told me it was the king/queen of its neighborhood.

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Muskie

Swimming out into the hinder lands
Turned to see a muskie following.
It circled once and then swam off.
Humbling to experience the raw wildness of nature
And how it feels to be something’s prey.


Posted in Animals, Connecting to Nature | 3 Comments

Saving the Planet, One Weed at a Time

For the past 21 years, four of us have transformed an abandoned lot into a native prairie.  The project has given us an opportunity to express ourselves as guardians of the Earth.  What would our Earth be like, if all humans did even 1-2 years of guardianship service for the land?

Hoary Vervain Likes to grow in dry conditions.

Hoary Vervain
Likes to grow in dry conditions.

There is a lot of talk about “saving the planet’, but I don’t believe the Earth operates on such grandiose terms. The caring of one person is important even if it doesn’t make the evening news.

Queen of the Prairie A wetland plant in the rose family with beautifully scented flowers.

Queen of the Prairie
A wetland plant in the rose family with beautifully scented flowers.

After 3-4 years the land took on a life of its own. A blooming prairie, bees, butterflies, grasshoppers, mice, sparrows, and us guardians –  formed a web of life.  The more connected to the land we were, the more life we felt because we were included.

Cup Plant The leaves of the plant form a "cup" that birds and insects drink from.

Cup Plant
The leaves of the plant form a “cup” that birds and insects drink from.

 

When we first started creating the Friends of the Trail Prairie, people walking by on the bike path would shake their heads in disbelief. Once a policeman stopped and asked me if I was feeling okay. One observer summed up all the other people’s thoughts, “What are you doing down there, do you know?”. It is no wonder, people were in disbelieve. It was an abandoned lot sandwiched between a suburban road and a bike path. One acre of European spurge, Canada thistle, ragweed, and brome grass.

Native Big Bluestem We plant over a hundred plants a year. We use the burlap from Peace Coffee to control weeds for the first two years.

Native Big Bluestem
We plant over a hundred plants a year. We use burlap from Peace Coffee to control weeds for the first two years. All new plantings need to be watered by hand.

The weeds in most restored prairies are treated with a heavy dose of  Round-up and land is left fallow for a year.  In 21 years we have not done any herbicide spraying because of the detriment that herbicides have on the land and on the subsurface water table.

Pale Coneflower

Pale Coneflower

Being at the prairie is like ingesting a type of food that I need for my own survival.

Butterflyweed A favorite of monarchs and pollinators.

Butterflyweed
A favorite of monarchs and pollinators.

 

This past season many of our native grasses did not grow. The thatch has built up over the years and smothered many of our plants. We need a burn on the prairie to reduce the thatch and weeds, but have been unable to get a permit from our city. Now we must extend our guardianship to the city government to speak up for the land.

Mountain Mint An August favorite of my types of pollinators.

Mountain Mint
An August favorite of many types of pollinators.

People walk by the prairie now and say, “It looks beautiful, thanks for your service”.
My thought is,
“It is not a service, but a partnership with the land.  We get more from the prairie, than we actually give”.

Rattlesnake Master A favorite of pollinators in July. The plant is a a northern type of agave .

Rattlesnake Master
A favorite of pollinators in July. The plant is a a northern type of agave .

 

The prairie has been beautiful this season because of all the rain we have had. But there have been several drought years. During those years, it was painful to be on the land and watch the plants slowly die from the lack of water. However, following those drought summers, the plants emerged, alive again.

Friends of the Prairie 21 years later

Friends of the Prairie
21 years and counting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Having a relationship with the land is different than landscaping a yard. At the prairie we encourage some plants to grow, by watering and protecting them from aggressive weeds. But in the end, the plants tell us whether they want to live or die there.

 Ironweed Blooms in late July to early August

Ironweed
Blooms in late July to early August

Monarda If you give it too much love it tends to take over. A favorite of pollinators in mid July.

Monarda or Bee Balm
If you give it too much love it tends to take over.
A favorite of pollinators in mid July.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Nature Guardians, Summer | 4 Comments

Walking on Sacred Land

A true story by Eric Wickiser and the Old Naturalist. Only the names have changed.

Spires2
One day weasel and deer mouse traveled to one of the canyons in the Badlands of  South Dakota to connect with the spirits of the land. Weasel found a rock that had special powers and would speak to him. The rock told him that there were spirits alive in the bluffs and weasel waited for them to make contact with him.

prayerOffering

The spirit offering

Rock1

 

 

But every time weasel stood beneath the bluffs, the spirits were silent. Weasel began to look around the canyon and noticed that there were beautiful stones everywhere. He collected them in his bag and made an offering to the spirits, but the spirits were silent.
Spires

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weasel moved up the canyon examining the rock walls. The patterns in the rocks and the tall spires made his heart soar. Weasel thought, “Surely, the spirits will speak to me here.” Weasel’s body felt heavy and he fell into a deep sleep in the shade of the summer sun. When he awoke he realized the spirits did not speak in the weasel tongue and that he needed to start listening in completely different way.

Toad Stool

Toad Stools

 

UpliftingFormationsFossil

 

mouse tracks in mud

mouse tracks in mud

 

Fossilized deer jaw

Fossilized deer jaw

bonesin wall

Possible squid fossil

Possible squid fossil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By  taking his time, weasel was able to notice things he had never seen before. Beautiful fossils, rocks and plants and skeletons of other animals laying on the ground.  Slowly weasel came to understand that this canyon was untouched by other weasels.  His brother, deer mouse, told him that the land in this canyon was totally alive and that nothing could be removed because everything was sacred. Time was no more and they were surrounded by abundant life.

Natural rock sculpture

Natural rock sculpture

Blazing Star

Blazing Star

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weasel and deer mouse slowly moved through the canyon in awe. Rocks, plants, grasses, old cedars, and even mud sculptures were all speaking to them. It touched their spirits deeply to be connected in such a way to the land.
HeartRock

Weasel knew that if he started taking objects, the magic of this land would be destroyed. His paws were quivering with the desire to take some of the beauty for his own, and that is when his friend, coyote appeared and told him that all this beauty was already a part of him and he only had to search inside of himself to find it.

Coyote Track

Coyote Track

 

CallingSpire

 

Weasel and deer mouse’s pace increased, something was calling them up the canyon. The river bed ended at a huge dry waterfall. They could go no further. Deer mouse said that the land did not want them to enter the sacred place. Weasel and deer mouse lingered at the base, savoring the feeling that their souls were being nurtured by the sacredness. As they walked back down the riverbed, their hearts were full and they realized that they would carry  this story back to their friends and relatives. Walking along quietly, they were aware that to really see and hear, they had to open their hearts, their minds and ears and take the time to drink in the rich beauty that surrounded them.

 

Posted in Nature Guardians, Nature Notes, Photography/Art | 3 Comments

Thirteen Year-old Naturalist

Felix Fettig at work

Felix Fettig at work

Felix Fettig is passionate about butterflies, native plants and amphibians. In 3rd grade Felix started raising monarch caterpillars and has done this activity for the past five years.

I just feel really passionate about this. I have raised monarchs, painted ladies, red admirals, polyphemus moths luna moths, cecropia moths, red spotted purples, viceroy, giant swallowtails, black swallowtails and tiger swallowtails. In all, I have raised and released hundreds of butterflies. This has got me a lot more interested in life science. I also like to growing carnivorous plants and love amphibians. That is why we built the pond up on the hill. Amphibians are very important because they are an indicator species.”

Butterfly garden, designed and planted by Felix when he was in 5th grade.

Butterfly garden, designed and planted by Felix when he was in 5th grade.

Felix's original butterfly garden plan

Felix’s original butterfly garden plan

White admiral in the butterfly garden.

White admiral in his butterfly garden.

 

Black swallowtail larvae. Felix Found the eggs on the parsley and dill and is feeding them Golden Alexander leaves.

Black swallowtail larvae. I found the eggs on the parsley and dill and am feeding them Golden Alexander leaves.”

 

This one is the tiger swallowtail. It is in its 5th instar and will turn brown soon. That is when you know it is going to pupate. I feed it green ash.

This one is the tiger swallowtail. It is in its 5th instar and will turn brown soon. That is when you know it is going to pupate. I feed it green ash.”

Felix was in 5th grade when he made this drawing.

Felix was in 5th grade when he made this drawing.

 

Monarch pupae. I raised the monarchs from eggs in my butterfly garden.

Monarch pupae.
“I raised the monarchs from eggs that were on the milkweed  in my butterfly garden.”

 

 

Salamander yearly migration cycle.

Salamander yearly migration cycle.

 

 

“The drawing above shows vernal pond and wintering pond/lake. The adults can’t breed in the wintering pond because the fish will eat the larva and adults. In the spring salamanders migrate to a vernal pond (has no fish and dries up in late spring). The adults lay their eggs and the larvae metamorphose before the pond dries up in the spring. They then spend the summer underground in the moist soil of the vernal pond and travel to the wintering pond/lake in the fall.”

 

Amphibian pond that Felix designed and built.

Amphibian pond that Felix designed and built last year.

 

Posted in Connecting to Nature, Insects | 5 Comments

Shadows Then Light – Wolf Ridge 2016

Old Naturalist: The Hopkins Field Biology Camp has been run by Scott Stillman for 18 years. He recently received a “Life Changer” award for his work with children and nature. During this year’s camp, I was surrounded by natural beauty, but the most inspiring thing for me was interacting with the young adults campers.

Photo by Jack Gunderson

Photo by Jack Gunderson

 

The Shadow
Like death falls the shadow
The blue, the green, the yellow
Everywhere this shadow lurks
Waiting
Until the golden rays bleed through.
Not to end, but to aid.
And when the shadow rises
You will learn its name
       Silence
Like the fog coming to trap the trees.
We can learn many things from silence.
Kathryn Sherman

Jessie Kurus photographing a Pitcher plant

Jessie Kurus photographing a pitcher plant

 

I think I have been killed one thousand times.
Although it is hard to count over the chimes.
For that’s the noise I make as I do die
I think it is God making a small noise
For each moment I lived in gentle poise
They count carefully and would never lie
I know the answer is carved in the stone
With this knowledge, I will not be alone.
So there is no reason to sit and mope
It is okay that I will die again.

For that means I will be a thousand men.
My future is all, at least I hope
Sarah Coval

Photo by Jackson Risser

Photo by Jackson Risser

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Nuala Kelly – Foley

Old Naturalist Note: Nuala said her work represents the expansiveness of the universe and the Earth is the blue dot at the top.


The summer sun is setting

Everyone is forgetting
The troubles of the day.
The calmness of the fallen trees
The serenity of waving leaves
The sun sinks towards the rolling hills.
Taking with it daytime’s thrills
The night bears arms to the open sky
Where the moon is soon to rise.
Bringing with it night’s unrest
The darkness pressing in your chest.
Then sleep will come

And next the sun,
Will rise outside your window.
Catriona Ray

A water droplet on a water lily. Photo by Soso Waterman

A water droplet on a water lily.
Photo by Soso Waterman

 

Tiny explorers determined and quick
High up above and deep under wet earth
Climb the trees tall and lark off at a flick
Forever never to learn caution’s worth
Tiny explorers hungry and buzzing.
Alighting on those that just wish them gone
Shooed half away with distracted fussing
Returning as soon as defences yawn.
Tiny explorers, jewel-bright and alive
Crawling and winging to sights unforeseen.
Rianna Ray

Mink Frog photo by Taylor Hedlund

Mink Frog
photo by Taylor Hedlund

 The leaf Jackson Risser

The leaf
Jackson Risser

 

 

An old gnarled giant of a tree
Fell from cloudless skies
To a darken underworld and buzzing flies
Illuminated by its old friend, the sun.

The broken branches envy the lofty trees
And remembers standing tall
Having leaves gilded with light
Whispering to the wind passing by.

The old tree finds happiness on the ground
It grows to like the chatter of squirrels
The whistling of grass and buzzing of flies
No longer missing the sky.
Lucy Smith

Rock Wall Dancer photo by Maggie Lund

Rock Wall Dancer
photo by Maggie Lund

 

Stream Study

Stream Study

 

The Dragonfly
Gliding on cellophane wings
A master of flight
Chasing other males from its spot
Feasting in the warmth of the day
You bless the land for all to see
What is it like to live a pond as a nymph?
And then take your first flight?
I feel the freedom in your wings
And long to be a partner with the wind
To see the world through your eyes
Teach me dragonfly, to let go
Of my tether to the land
And come to your world.
Lawrence Wade

Bethany Catcka

Bethany Cacka

Photo Gallery

Stream analysis

Stream analysis

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Voyageurs photo by Jim Ikhaml

Voyageurs
photo by Jim Ikhaml

 

emerald Jewelwing

emerald Jewelwing

Indian Pipe Photo by Jackson Risser

Indian Pipe
Photo by Jackson Risser

Wetland Study

Wetland Study – Mud City Photo by Jack Gunderson

Photo by Paul Pressnall

Photo by Paul Pressnall

Bullfrog

Bullfrog

Slug Alert!

Slug Alert!

Photo by Jack Gunderson

Photo by Jack Gunderson

 

Posted in Nature Poetry, Photography/Art | 1 Comment

Galapagos Dreams

The ArtStart Camp run by Carol Sirrine is in its 25th year. The theme this week was the Galapagos Islands. The students in our classes were between 6  and 11 years old. Their dedication to their work and attention to detail was beyond their years. It was very inspiring working with these children.  I have included material from three different classes taught by Jeanette Dickinson (mosiac), Sarah Honeywell and Louise Mader (visual arts).

Becca Richman Flying Fish

Becca Richman
Flying Fish

The flying fish is name the flying fish because it can “fly” above the water for more than two football fields. It lives in pelagic oceans and hunts smaller fish and zooplankton

Maya Vossen Nelson Orca Whale

Maya Vossen Nelson
Orca Whale

 

Orca or killer whale males get up to 30 feet long and have a 6 foot high dorsal fin. They live in family groups that are usually controlled by the oldest female. Orcas feed on large fish, dolphins, and whales, usually hunting in packs. They are known as the wolves of the sea.

Pria Stauning Dolphin

Pria Stauning
Dolphin

Dolphins can have up to 250 teeth in their mouth. They do not drink water, instead dolphins get all of the water they need from the fish they eat. Dolphins find their food by using echolocation, a type of sonar. They can’t see all the colors, but they can sea shades of grey as well as the blue-green spectrum of light.

Elena Metzger Octopus

Elena Metzger
Octopus

Octopus have four pairs of arms and two eyes. They have rows of suckers on each arm.

Nolan Andresen Blue Ringed Octopus

Nolan Andresen
Blue Ringed Octopus

 

The blue ringed octopus is packed with enough venom to kill 26 people within minutes. It is the most venomous octopus in the world.

 

Alex Loes Breaching Humpback

Alex Loes
Breaching Humpback

 

Elizabeth Tuttle Tuna and Shark

Elizabeth Tuttle
Tuna and Shark

Tuna can grow to be over 1,000 pounds in weight. The tuna is one of the fastest fish in the world and if a schooling fish.Sharks are the tigers of the sea. The great white shark is the most feared man-eating shark.

Mikey Barshack Green Sea Turtle

Mikey Barshack
Green Sea Turtle

Calla Massari Batfish

Calla Massari
Batfish

They have long dorsal and anal fins that five them a unique shape. The batfish is two to three inches in height. The pinnatus batfish’s scientific name is Palax pinnatus. They are found in the Galapagos Islands.

Alex Loes Squid

Alex Loes
Squid

Squid have excellent eye sight allowing them to locate food. They have 8 arms and each arm has sucker discs that they use for grabbing their prey. They eat small schooling fish and plankton. They tear the prey apart with their parrot like beak.

Abby Sikora Green Sea Turtle

Abby Sikora
Green Sea Turtle

Callum Schultz Marine Iguana

Callum Schultz
Marine Iguana

The Marine iguana is the only existing marine lizard on the Earth. They are endemic to the Galapagos Islands. They feed on algae in the near shore waters. To filter-out excess salt that he/she consumes, this iguana has specialized nasal glands that expel it from its nostrils.

Haven Purviance

Haven Purviance

Ingrid Johnson Octopus

Ingrid Johnson
Octopus

They are 24-36 inches long. It has eight long limbs coming out form its head. It has two rows of sucker discs on each limb, and they use them to sense and taste the environment. The octopus has a useful ability to grow back a tentacle if it loses one.

Luna Scorzelli Green Sea Turtle

Luna Scorzelli
Green Sea Turtle

Sea turtles are one of the Earth’s most ancient creatures, living more than 110 million years, since the time of the dinosaurs. The shell or carapace is streamlined so it can swim quickly through the water. Unlike other turtles sea turtles can not use their legs on land, since they have developed into fins over time.

Pearl Gordon Moray Eel

Pearl Gordon
Moray Eel

Eels are 10 feet long. They have long needle-like teeth them grab and hold their prey. Eels will attack a human if they are wounded or disturbed in their dens.

Naomi Fink Macaroni Penguin

Naomi Fink
Macaroni Penguin

Beela Kelly Octopus

Beela Kelly
Octopus

 

They spend most of their life under rocks, leaving at night to hunt for crabs and clams. They have a beak-like mouth that allows them pry open or break open shells. They can change color rapidly if a predator is near.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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